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Products – DT Trainer – CARET References

Excerpts from Selected CARET References

CARET – Center for Applied Research in Educational Technology

TOPIC: Student Learning

Q: How can technology address the needs of low performing, at-risk, and learning handicapped students?

A: Carefully chosen technology applications that provide immediate student feedback and progress monitoring can be more effective than regular group instruction for educationally handicapped students.

RESEARCH EVIDENCE

Weir (1987) documented the effectiveness of using computers to develop and assess learning strategies for children with cerebral palsy, autism, or severe learning disabilities.

Expert tutoring software presents instruction in small, sequential steps, at varying levels of difficulty, and students can use the software independently, working at their own pace. Most critical for the effectiveness of the software with low performing, at-risk, or learning handicapped students, however, is the capacity of the software to analyze performance and give feedback to teachers and students (Bos & Vaughn, 1994; Hofmeister & Lubke, 1988).

Technological tools that provide frequent student feedback motivate learning disabled students to remain cognitively engaged, particularly when corrective feedback is immediately provided (Goldenberg, Russell, & Carter, 1984).

Q: How can technology address the needs of low performing, at-risk, and learning handicapped students?

A: Carefully chosen technology applications that provide immediate student feedback and progress monitoring can be more effective than regular group instruction for educationally handicapped students.

RESEARCH EVIDENCE

Weir (1987) documented the effectiveness of using computers to develop and assess learning strategies for children with cerebral palsy, autism, or severe learning disabilities.

Expert tutoring software presents instruction in small, sequential steps, at varying levels of difficulty, and students can use the software independently, working at their own pace. Most critical for the effectiveness of the software with low performing, at-risk, or learning handicapped students, however, is the capacity of the software to analyze performance and give feedback to teachers and students (Bos & Vaughn, 1994; Hofmeister & Lubke, 1988).

Technological tools that provide frequent student feedback motivate learning disabled students to remain cognitively engaged, particularly when corrective feedback is immediately provided (Goldenberg, Russell, & Carter, 1984).